Food

Korean food and recipes

Sharing Cookies 3

Sharing Cookies

Some of the first ever comics I did on this blog were about Hugh’s obsession with cookies. I’ve talked about how most Korean homes don’t have ovens so people don’t bake at home. Discovering how good cookies (or biscuits in Aussie English) actually are was a revelation for Hugh. While we are in Australia he has been eating as many as he can. The first day we arrived in Australia he said, “So, who is going to make me cookies?” My brother made him some and I’ve been making them while we are at my parents’ house.

The morning we had to babysit our friend’s kids, I caught him in the act of hiding the cookies in our room. I still gave the twin boys a cookie each and Hugh was horrified when they tried to feed our dog their cookies, and I think one even ended up in the fish pond. A cookie that is, not a twin.

We also have a family recipe for chocolate chip cookies, which I’ve tweaked further for white chocolate chip cookies, that people seem to really like. Hugh loves them most though.

We will both be on diets when we go back to Korea next week.

Share Button

Sushi Specially Made 0

Another quick video in our Australian Summer series:

There is quite a difference between sushi in Australia and sushi in Korea. In Korea you are often given frozen salmon (not a fan) and although Korea is so close to Japan, it’s harder to get good sushi (at least the type that we like). Sushi in Sydney has a big range of quality, but our friend is head chef at this place and the sushi is good and fresh. It’s also great to have a chef make it exactly how you like it! We have another friend who is Japanese and a top sushi chef in Seoul – but his restaurant is pretty expensive (he has served big stars like G-Dragon before). So great sushi is available in Korea, but a bit out of our price range. It’s a lot easier to eat sushi in Sydney.

Share Button

Bread Love 2

Bread Love

Hugh doesn’t appreciate my bread loving in the supermarket! There is just something nice about coming back to your home country and buying the brands that you know and love. Korea has a lack of grainy breads. Breads labelled “with grains” have so few grains that you could count them easily in a whole loaf. So of course I got some of this bread, gonna go eat some with vegemite now!

Share Button

BIGGEST DONKATSU EVER CHALLENGE! 2

This donkatsu (pork cutlet) is huge! Hugh and his friend try this challenge where you have to eat this massive donkatsu and rice in 20 mins or pay about $15.

There was no way I was going to try this challenge, but because we were staying with our friends Simon and Martina (of Eat Your Kimchi) while in Seoul, Simon decided he would try it as well after hearing Hugh talk about it. You can see their video here.

Share Button

Unusual Korean Seafood: Gaebul 0

Korea has some really interesting seafood, but this is one that usually incites giggles.

Probably our most mature video ever right?

The penis fish can also be called “the fat innkeeper worm” by those who refuse to acknowledge what it looks like. Commonly found at seafood markets in Korea, we were just walking past a restaurant in Jinju that had these at the front. Usually gaebul is seen in buckets or baskets lying flat, but some of these were hanging down and gently swaying in the water. I first posted the video on Instagram and the popularity of it there made us decide to post on YouTube too, but we made it educational! Come try gaebul in Korea! Eaten raw with salt and sesame oil. (Also we said “kinda” translates to “dog penis” because actually it’s “dog balls” which doesn’t seem as correct).

Share Button

Mokbang 3

Mokbang

When I’m sick I don’t want to be near food or see people eating it, but Hugh will still sit with everyone at dinner time and watch us eat! He watches what I eat carefully and urges me to eat certain things and chastises me when I’m not eating enough. I’m assuming this is also related to how popular ‘mokbangs’ are in Korea. A mokbang is a live stream of someone eating often copious amounts of food. Lots of people tune it to watch these. There is also such a focus on “eating well” in Korea. If you eat a lot at dinner you are complimented. My mother in law is always happier when I’ve eaten a lot at dinner and I get the type of praise you’d only give a child in Australia. “Well done! You ate well!”

Hugh gets really frustrated when he has no appetite because he is sick and thinks I’m not enjoying the food as much as I should be. Luckily he isn’t sick now, this was the other week.

He’s also been wearing a cute yellow scarf when he’s been sick to keep his throat warm.

Share Button

HUGH VIDEO: KOREANS EAT SO MUCH 2

Hey, it’s Hugh. I vlogged about a normal social situation in Korea where we eat so much. Many times we go to a wedding or ‘dol’ and eat so much, then we go out with friends and go to 3 or 4 restaurants in one night… so much food…

Share Button

Expensive Kimchi 6

Expensive Kimchi

What things do you hate paying for because you usually get it for free?

Making kimchi is a skill that is not as common with the younger generation and a lot of people are just buying instead of making it. I have heard that a lot is being made in China though, so the quality of ingredients can’t be checked and there are many other factors that can affect the taste. When we get our own place I’ll still try to make kimchi so we don’t need to buy it from the supermarket. Hopefully we’ll still get my mother in law’s kimchi too. If someone supplies you with homemade kimchi you should appreciate it! ^^

Share Button

Squid Breath 5

Squid Breath

To be fair, he had been eating fresh squid, not dried squid, which doesn’t have the same strong smell. But if I had just been eating mac and cheese he’d be insisting I brush my teeth.

Share Button

SOONDAE TRUCK 7

Twice a week the Soondae Ahjussi visits nearby with his soondae truck. Now I’ve mentioned before that I don’t like soondae, but I’ve had a change of heart and now I quite like it! I don’t like eating it at open markets where it can have a strong smell and looks like it’s been sitting there for a while…haha, I can still be picky. I only started liking it after trying it at this soondae truck because it’s so fresh and there are different flavours. Hugh has always loved it though and it’s one of his favourite foods.

Soondae can also be romanised as “sundae” but I think that spelling can cause some problems for foreigners who are expecting ice cream…

Share Button

Kimchi Jjigae 12

Kimchi Jjigae

The thing is, he learned how to make kimchi jjigae (kimchi stew) from me, and I learned from Maangchi!

When we lived in Sydney there were times that we’d eat kimchi jjigae for a week because we were so obsessed with it. We’d get really good quality pork and add in extra stuff. I think the good memories we have for that time make us long for that type of kimchi jjigae too.

My mother in law (and so then my sister-in-law) make a simpler, thinner, healthier kimchi jjigae and cut all the fat off the pork and don’t add any sugar or much sesame oil. While it’s better for us health-wise, we do miss the way we make it. Hugh is going to make it sometime because he is longing for that taste.

Also, because he can make kimchi jjigae well, Hugh is convinced he is a “master chef”, although he can barely make anything else…

Share Button

Big Chopsticks 14

Big chopsticks

We were at a Japanese restaurant the other day so the chopsticks were bigger and rounder than Korean metal ones. I felt very clumsy using them. Korean ones can be a pain to get used to, because they are flat and small, but once you can use them well it feels more precise and it’s hard to switch back.

Share Button

Motel TV 5

Motel TV

So much watching people eat on Korean TV.

We’ve been in Seoul for another project and got home last night. Will be trying to catch up on videos and comics over the weekend. (Fingers crossed, still dealing with some health issues).

Share Button

More Cookies 16

More Cookies

Since there isn’t really a baking culture in Korea, for some Koreans (my husband in particular) tasting real home made cookies can be like a religious experience. In Korea, cookies (or biscuits in Australian/British English) are just store bought ones and even ones in cafes are not that good. Whenever we are in Australia Hugh demands more and more cookies. There are a lot of people living at my parents’ house so he was very concerned about other people eating the cookies. Several times I caught him trying to hide the container of cookies in our room.

It’s also interesting comparing childhood experiences with Koreans in regards to cooking. For example, baking is a relatively safe activity to do with children and my siblings and I were able to bake and make cakes and cookies from an early age. Since most homes in Korea don’t have ovens, it isn’t possible to get children baking at a young age and other types of cooking (stove top cooking) are more dangerous for young children. Not only are baking skills not learnt early on in Korea, but even buying simple baking items like measuring cups and wooden spoons can be difficult.

Did you learn how to bake when you were young?

Share Button

Retro Korean Candy 4

We try some old Korean candy:

What candy do you remember eating as a child?

Share Button

© 2012-2016 My Korean Husband All Rights Reserved -- Copyright notice by Blog Copyright