My Korean Husband

Intercultural Life

Category: Random silly (page 1 of 29)

English in Seoul

We lived in the Korean countryside for over 2 years and not that many people are fluent English speakers there, so Hugh and I got into the habit of not really moderating what we said in public. In Seoul we still sometimes say things loudly in English that maybe isn’t the most appropriate thing to say.

We were in a department store when I was asking Hugh to comment on the size of my butt (I wasn’t sure about Korean sizes). A guy walked past and obviously heard and burst into laughter. Like that sudden snorting laughter. His laughter made me laugh as well, but reminded me that many people can understand me here.

Have you ever had a situation like that before?

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Best Christmas Song (according to Hugh)

Hugh didn’t really experience a real Christmas until he met me, but there was a Christmas song back in the 90’s that touched his heart.

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What Colour?

What colour

Just Hugh trolling me to make it seem like I was being offensive. Thanks Hugh.

Random fact of the day from Wikipedia: Uzbekistan has an ethnic Korean population that was forcibly relocated to the region by Stalin from the Soviet Far East in 1937–1938. 

Actually the Wikipedia page for Uzbekistan is really interesting. Uzbekistan is Central Asia’s most populous country. The demographic section is fascinating.

I went down the Wikipedia wormhole because I was suddenly curious about Uzbekistan while making this comic.

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Crowd

Crowd

“Oppa” is the Korean term that I often use for Hugh as he is an older male. It can also be used in the context of our relationship as a pet name. Unfortunately in a crowd there are many “oppas” so Hugh often assumes it’s a woman calling out to another guy, and not to him. If I call out “Oppa” to him it doesn’t really get his attention. Calling out “Hugh” also doesn’t get his attention if we are in a loud place. Lately I’ve been calling out “oi” in a very Australian accent and have found it works so much better! Especially when I stress my Australian accent as he knows it’s immediately me. The word “oi” is used quite a bit in Australian English.

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Terrified by Virtual Reality

Hugh and Joel try out VR in Hongdae in Seoul. It’s about 6,000 won for 20 minutes if you are looking to have the pants scared off you.

Have you tried something like this?

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Before Interview

Before Interview

Hugh wavers between being loud and outgoing and then shy and reserved when doing interviews in English. He actually ended up being more outgoing in this interview, but not quite like his performance just before it.

Radio interviews always seems to come in groups. It will be months and months without any and then suddenly we have a whole bunch lined up. We did one with Asian Pop radio recently and have one with Arirang coming up and something with our local area in Seoul.

(And yes he wasn’t wearing clothes during the interview).

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Intercultural Confessions Challenge

We thought up this challenge because after being married for several years I think we are comfortable confessing to some secrets or how we feel about some things in each other’s cultures. And I guess the challenge is not to descend into an argument! Haha! What food do we not like? What do we think is weird? What did we lie about?

We’d love to see some other couples do this challenge.

 

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