my korean husband

Tofu 1

Tofu

I actually really like tofu and it’s used so well in Korean cooking as a proper ingredient and not like a meat substitute in western cooking. Korean tofu is great too! But I just don’t get that automatic reaction of drooling at slabs of tofu on food shows that Hugh gets. I was just thinking about how I wish it was cheese. I’d be drooling if it was a big slab of cheese.

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BEST KOREAN CHINESE FOOD 1

It seems like every country has their own version of Chinese food. We show you the best Korean Chinese food we’ve had. I think it helps that it’s actually Chinese people running the restaurant, because usually Chinese food restaurants are run by Koreans. Unless it’s an actual real Chinese restaurant with Chinese food, not food adapted for Korean tastes.

In Australia at Chinese restaurants there is usually a big list of dishes to choose from, but not in Korea. In fact, often it just comes down to the three dishes we show you in the video. Like any other country, the quality of the food can vary greatly depending where you go. There is totally gross delivery food, just average food, tasty but heavy and greasy, and then wonderful food like this. For example, the pork was strips of tender pork that you can easily see. Many other not as good restaurants will cut up tiny amounts of bad quality pork and batter it so much that it’s 90% batter and 10% pork. Not this restaurant, their sweet and sour pork is so good, as you can see in the video.

What is your country’s version of Chinese food?

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SEOUL LIFE: ACCIDENT WITH MEXICAN CANDY 0

Hugh has been so excited about Mexican culture lately (renewed enthusiasm for learning Spanish) but unfortunately he discovered he doesn’t like sour Mexican candy. He really doesn’t like anything sour, but I liked it!

It’s been a more quiet week, but Hugh still managed plenty of socializing. I made many trips to the convenience store to buy Australian Lemon, Lime and Bitters, and still managed to always miss seeing the famous people coming out of YG Entertainment.

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Intercultural Confessions Challenge 2

We thought up this challenge because after being married for several years I think we are comfortable confessing to some secrets or how we feel about some things in each other’s cultures. And I guess the challenge is not to descend into an argument! Haha! What food do we not like? What do we think is weird? What did we lie about?

We’d love to see some other couples do this challenge.

 

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Too Hot 7

 

Too Hot

Worst summer ever! It’s been such a hot summer and we’ve been unable to do so many things we want to because of the heat and the humidity. Although I’m used to hot weather in Australia, Australian homes usually have air conditioners that cool down the whole house but Korean homes tend to just have air con in one room so most of the house can still be so hot. Also… no swimming culture. The heat has made me a bit sick lately, and sleep deprived as it’s too hot to sleep well. Hugh has been dealing with the heat by laying still while naked.

We do get warning messages on our phones about the heat, as well as other times there is any slight danger, like too much rain or fog. At first these messages would freak me out. Is North Korea invading??? But usually it’s nothing much.

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Seoul Life – Englishmen Visitors and a Wedding 0

I’m sure many people know who Josh and Ollie are, from the Korean Englishman YouTube channel, and if you don’t, I’m sure you’ve stumbled across one of their insanely popular videos at some point. Hugh’s good friend Joel is also in some of their videos and contacted Hugh because they wanted to film on a farm. Oh, we have a farm! So we headed back to the countryside so the boys could film in Hugh’s village. We will have a video of some of the behind the scenes stuff up later, once their farm videos come out. But for now, here is a sneak peek.

We complain more about the heat also. I wanted to point out that it’s almost impossible to keep air con on constantly in Korea. Hugh was telling me that there is an outdated law from the 1970’s where electricity bills double and then triple for people, but businesses are exempt. So Korean homes can be very hot in the summer because people try to rely on fans rather than constant air con. It has been way more uncomfortable than in Australia.

In this video we also talked about the yellow dust pollution and how it affects Hugh more. I do have a theory why: Hugh’s father used to be a smoker so Hugh grew up around a lot more cigarette smoke than me so maybe that’s why, because his throat and lungs have already been compromised, even though Hugh is not a smoker himself. In comparison, I have had very little exposure to smoke my whole life.

We also attend Cory and Marie’s wedding. It was a lovely wedding, and even in the heat, we had so much fun.

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Hoju Olympics 0

Hoju Olympics

Have you been watching the Olympics? I saw one swimming race that Australia won but besides from that I haven’t seen much. Hugh has been watching more than me.

Do you know the Korean name for your own country?

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Seoul Life: Watermelon Noodles and Joel’s Photos 0

In this Seoul Life video we eat some amazing watermelon cold noodles, Hugh shows some of his work day, and we catch up with Joel, who is back in Korea briefly.

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Korean Eyebrow Gel 0

We’ve been seeing this eyebrow gel all over the Korean beauty blogs on Facebook, so Hugh wanted to try it out. He always wants thicker eyebrows, but is too lazy to use an eyebrow powder or pencil every day. This stuff actually stains the skin underneath the eyebrow and you peel it off after it dried. Unfortunately it isn’t exactly what he wanted and expected…

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Same Age 6

Same Age

If you are completely unfamiliar with Korean culture and respectful terms, this comic might be a little bit difficult to understand.

The longer we’ve been back in Korean culture, the more Hugh likes being called “Oppa”. Since it was my birthday recently, my age “caught up” to his. This doesn’t happen in Korean age because everyone’s age goes up at the same time at the start of the year. But in international age there are a few months where our ages are the same. Hugh pointed this out. In Korea if someone is the same age as you it means you are friends in the sense that neither person needs to use a respectful name for the other, because neither is older than the other. It allows for much more relaxed speech and manners usually.

So I took the opportunity to act like a “chingu” instead of a “dongseng” (the younger one in the relationship). Used to be an “oppa”, Hugh suddenly realised he had made a terrible mistake…

In English I am very free and comfortable and can tease him with no problems. But in Korean, in a Korean setting he suddenly realised how different it was if he wasn’t my Oppa anymore. Especially because I used the opportunity to be rude.

Hugh says: I was saying, “You are the same as my age now! Hahaha!” And making fun, but actually it’s not good for me. I still like to be called Oppa.

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Seoul Life: Week 8 0

In this week’s Seoul Life video we talk about our latest Kpop encounter, show some old Korean commercials, visit beautiful parks and Hugh gets a surprise present (even though it was my birthday! haha).

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Weird things in Seoul? 0

In every city you come across some weird things sometimes. We couldn’t make a Seoul Life video (because busy while my mother was visiting) but we put together a few things we have filmed recently. The streets being bug sprayed, cats with colourful tails and watching men go down into the sewers. The bug spray thing is quite strange to me because I don’t think that type of thing has been done in Australia for so long. I have no idea what exactly they are spraying with but it conjures up images from the past of DDT… which is always worrying. But it’s banned in South Korea… so I do wonder what they are using? Let me know if you know more about it!

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How we make our marriage work 0

We get a lot of messages where people need advice and we do out best to answer them. We decided it was time to make a video talking about how we make our marriage work and what things we do to make a happy life together. The video was actually over 30 mins long but of course cut down, so there was many more things we had to say!

We wrote down what we wanted to say, but I ended up doing more of the talking because Hugh isn’t as comfortable in English for a more scripted video BUT if you get him in person he will talk your ear off!

 

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Korea has changed so much 1

We visited this museum a few years ago but wanted to show my mum while she is visited because it’s so interesting to get a glimpse into Korea’s recent past, especially while in modern Seoul.

Korea’s modern history of development is actually pretty amazing. It is one of the only countries in the world to go from a war-torn, poverty stricken country, to a developed, technologically driven, modern country in such a short amount of time. South Korea had to receive foreign aid after the Korean war, it was poorer than North Korea at one point, but is now a country that gives aid to countries in need. It’s a pretty big deal that they were able to change and develop so quickly. This is one of the reasons why looking back into recent history is so fascinating. Hugh’s childhood differs a lot to mine. My mother is visiting and came with us and we talked about how Hugh’s childhood is actually more similar to hers in the 1960’s in Australia, than mine in the 1980’s/1990’s in Australia (because Korea was behind in so many developments compared to Australia). Many of the things from the 1960’s and 1970’s were still like that, especially in the rural areas, during a lot of Hugh’s childhood, so he could reminisce while in the museum. When people are interested in South Korea now, they see the Kpop and the Kdramas and the glamour and technology, but not that long ago things were very different. While this museum focuses mostly on how people lived, there are displays about Korea’s traumatic history last century: of course Japanese occupation and the Korean war. It’s worth the trip up to Paju to see this museum. Tourist brochures explain how to get there and their website is here.

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SEOUL LIFE EPISODE 6 0

We didn’t have time to sit down and film and talk as much as we usually do for ‘Seoul Life’ because my mum is here for 2 weeks and my brother and his girlfriend were here for a few days. This video is a bit more random. Hugh tries to play Pokemon Go, I find a cheese shop, we go to a restaurant called Pork University and spend time with family. And we find a random Ferrari.

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