my korean husband

TRYING WEIRD KOREAN CHIPS 0

Sara joins us to try these more unusual chip flavours. We had never seen them before and we wonder how long they will last in stores…

A note about YouTube. Firstly there is a subscribers glitch. Lots and lots of active subscribers are being unsubscribed from channels so make sure you are still subscribed to us here.

Also, as well as having a bunch of glitches at the moment, YouTube is also favouring videos that have interaction immediately. We’ve hardly ever asked for likes on YouTube before but now it seems we have to. So if you watch our videos, hitting that like button (and also commenting) really helps us out and determins if YouTube will suggest our videos to other viewers. Thanks!

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SEOUL LIFE: Does being in Korea change how I speak? 0

Extra long SEOUL LIFE video as it’s been a while. We explain why in the video. We show you what we’ve been doing and answer some questions.

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What Colour? 4

What colour

Just Hugh trolling me to make it seem like I was being offensive. Thanks Hugh.

Random fact of the day from Wikipedia: Uzbekistan has an ethnic Korean population that was forcibly relocated to the region by Stalin from the Soviet Far East in 1937–1938. 

Actually the Wikipedia page for Uzbekistan is really interesting. Uzbekistan is Central Asia’s most populous country. The demographic section is fascinating.

I went down the Wikipedia wormhole because I was suddenly curious about Uzbekistan while making this comic.

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HALAL KOREAN FOOD 0

We took the opportunity to film some halal Korean food when we had lunch with friends recently. There are now more and more opportunities for Muslim tourists in Korea and Korea is becoming popular with Muslim travellers, especially those who are fans of Kpop and Kdramas. Korea is also considered a very safe place for Muslims to visit and live. It’s getting easier to eat halal food in Korea. Our friends also eat in normal Korean restaurants and just make sure they are eating seafood, not other meat.

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Crowd 1

Crowd

“Oppa” is the Korean term that I often use for Hugh as he is an older male. It can also be used in the context of our relationship as a pet name. Unfortunately in a crowd there are many “oppas” so Hugh often assumes it’s a woman calling out to another guy, and not to him. If I call out “Oppa” to him it doesn’t really get his attention. Calling out “Hugh” also doesn’t get his attention if we are in a loud place. Lately I’ve been calling out “oi” in a very Australian accent and have found it works so much better! Especially when I stress my Australian accent as he knows it’s immediately me. The word “oi” is used quite a bit in Australian English.

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Halloween in Korea 0

Our first Halloween in Korea! Actually it’s the first Halloween we had celebrated together because it’s only just started getting popular in Korea and Australians don’t really celebrate it that much (or if you do celebrate it, there can be so much negativity about it being an American thing and backlash about American culture being in Australia). Australian Christian communities can be very anti Halloween as well, much to the surprise of my Christian American friends who celebrate it. I think there being so many Americans in Seoul has influenced how popular Halloween, especially with young people. Also older people complimented on our costumes as well, we didn’t feel any negativity about it (well besides from the girl that Alex scared!).

I was Miss Havisham from Great Expectations, though most people assumed I was a ghost bride or something. Hugh was an Australian bogan zombie. I guess ‘bogan’ can be translated as ‘white trash’. He also had racist tattoos on his arms, not just the Southern Cross but “Aussie Pride” and “F*** Off, we’re full”. His costume was a bit subversive because of course that type of person is racist to Asians and those types of tattoos proudly display that racism. So he was also poking fun at a certain white stereotype, while at the same time embracing other aspects of Australian culture (he wore thongs/flip flops, board shorts, a cricket singlet and sunscreen while holding a VB beer).

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Seoul Life: Why Autumn is sad to Koreans 0

In this Seoul Life we show a bit of our Halloween, we talk about how Koreans often see Autumn as a really sad and depressing time, we meet baby Gyo and announce BTS giveaway winners.

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